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The position of the state in global capitalism: a Polanyian perspective
 
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Department of Political Theory and Political Thought of the Faculty of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Warsaw
Publication date: 2021-07-05
 
Studia Politologiczne 2021;60
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
The aim of the article is to analyze the changing position of the state in the capitalist world economy form the perspective of Karl Polanyi’s political theory. The main thesis of the article is that the position of the state largely depends on the character of rules constituting global political economy. Three world regimes were singled out (gold standard, Bretton Woods system, and hyperglobalization), and the position of the state within each system was analyzed. If we agree with Robert Cox that each world order is a product of ideas, institutions and power relations, then we may expect the institutional structure of the world economy to evolve following the changes in the underlying constellation of ideas and social forces.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I would like to thank Sławomir Czech, Ph.D. for his comments on the first version of the text.
FUNDING
The article was written within a research project “Market and Politics. A Study of Political Philosophy of Karl Polanyi”, financed by the National Science Centre (registration number: 2016/20/S/HS5/00556).
PEER REVIEW INFORMATION
Article has been screened for originality
peer-reviewed
 
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ISSN:1640-8888