PL EN RU
The Islamic State’s Worldview as a Radical Terror Management Device
 
More details
Hide details
1
Institute of Political Science, University of Wroclaw
Publication date: 2022-04-01
 
Studia Politologiczne 2022;63
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
The US reaction to 9/11 set off a chain of events leading to the raise of the most radical strain of revolutionary Salafism ideology incarnated by the Islamic State. The analysis of IS worldview allows one to observe its striking compatibility with the fundamental tenets of Terror Management Theory (TMT). The main proposition of this article is that the Islamic State’s worldview should be interpreted as a product of an ideological evolution triggered/amplified by the Global War on Terror (GWOT), leading towards reenergization of the revolutionary Salafi narrative and increasingly radical – and thus psychologically efficient but strategically flawed – terror management device.
PEER REVIEW INFORMATION
Article has been screened for originality
two double-anonymous peer reviews
 
REFERENCES (50)
1.
Adnan A., Islam is in crisis, «The Arab Weekly», July 31. 2016, https://thearabweekly.com/isla... (18.01.2022).
 
2.
Alcorta C. S., Religion, health, and the social signaling model of religion, «Religion, Brain and Behavior» 2011, 1 (3).
 
3.
Alshech E., The Doctrinal Crisis within the Salafi-Jihadi Ranks and the Emergence of NeoTakfirism. A Historical and Doctrinal Analysis, «Islamic Law and Society» 2014, 21 (4).
 
4.
Barlow H., Dead for Good: Martyrdom and the Rise of the Suicide Bomber, Paradigm Publishers 2007.
 
5.
Becker E., The Denial of Death, Free Press 1973.
 
6.
Bunzel C., From Paper State to Caliphate: The Ideology of the Islamic State, The Brookings Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World, Analysis Paper No 19. 2019, https://www.brookings.edu/wp-c... (18.01.2022).
 
7.
Cohen F. et al., Fatal Attraction: The Effects of Mortality Salience on Evaluations of Charismatic, Task-Oriented, and Relationship-Oriented Leaders, «Psychological Science» 2004, 15 (12).
 
8.
Droogan J., Peattie S., Mapping the thematic landscape of Dabiq magazine, «Australian Journal of International Affairs» 2017, 76 (6).
 
9.
Durie M., Islam’s Second Crisis: the troubles to come, «Middle East Forum», February 13. 2014, https://www.meforum.org/3750/i... (18.01.2022).
 
10.
Freedman L., Strategy. A History, Oxford University Press 2013.
 
11.
Goldenberg J. L. et al., I Am Not an Animal: Mortality Salience, Disgust, and the Denial of Human Creatureliness, «Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 2001», 130 (3).
 
12.
Greenberg J. et al., The causes and consequences of a need for self-esteem: A terror management theory [in:] R. F. Baumeister (ed.), Public Self and Private Self, Springer Verlag 1986.
 
13.
Greenberg J. et al., Evidence for Terror Management Theory II: The Effects of Mortality Salience on Reactions to Those Who Threaten or Bolster the Cultural Worldview, «Journal of Personality and Social Psychology» 1990, 58 (2).
 
14.
Greenberg J. et al., Why Do People Need Self-Esteem? Converging Evidence that Self-esteem Serves an Anxiety-Buffering Function, «Journal of Personality and Social Psychology» 1992, 63 (6).
 
15.
Greenberg J. et al., Evidence of a Terror Management Function of Cultural Icons: The Effects of Mortality Salience on the Inappropriate Use of Cherished Cultural Symbols, «Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin» 1995, 21 (11).
 
16.
Greenberg J. et al., The Worm at the Core: On the Role of Death in Life, Random House 2015.
 
17.
Hall D. L. et al., Costly signaling increases trust, even across religious affiliations, «Psychological Science» 2015, 26 (9).
 
18.
Hall D. L., Gonzales J. P., Religious group identity and costly signaling, «Religion, Brain and Behavior» 2016, 7 (3).
 
19.
Irons W., Religion as a hard-to-fake sign of commitment, [in:] R. M. Nesse (ed.), Vol. 3 in the Russell Sage Foundation series on trust. Evolution and the capacity for commitment, Russell Sage Foundation 2001.
 
20.
Jonas E., Fischer P., Terror Management and Religion: Evidence That Intrinsic Religiousness Mitigates Worldview Defense Following Mortality Salience, «Journal of Personality and Social Psychology» 2006, 91 (3).
 
21.
Landau M. J. et al., The Siren’s Call: Terror Management and the Threat of Men’s Sexual Attraction to Women, «Journal of Personality and Social Psychology» 2006, 90 (1).
 
22.
Maher S., Salafi-Jihadism: the History of an Idea, Oxford University Press 2016.
 
23.
McGregor H. A. et al., Terror Management and Aggression: Evidence That Mortality Salience Motivates Aggression Against Worldview-Threatening Others, «Journal of Personality and Social Psychology» 1998, 74 (3).
 
24.
Pyszczynski T. et al., In the Wake of 9/11. The Psychology of Terrorism, American Psychological Association 2003.
 
25.
Rambo L. R., Understanding Religious Conversion, Yale University Press 1993.
 
26.
Robinson F., Crisis of Authority: Crisis of Islam, «Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society» 2009, 19 (3).
 
27.
Rosenblatt A. et al., Evidence for Terror Management Theory I: The Effects of Mortality Salience on Reactions to Those Who Violate or Uphold Cultural Values, «Journal of Personality and Social Psychology» 1989, 57 (4).
 
28.
Schmid A., Public Opinion Survey Data to Measure Sympathy and Support for Islamic Terrorism: A Look at the Muslim Opinions on Al Qaeda and IS, International Centre for Counter-Terrorism, Research Paper, February 2017, https://icct.nl/wp-content/upl... (18.01.2022).
 
29.
Vertzberger Y., Misperception in international politics: A typological framework of analysis, «Empirical and Theoretical Research in International Relations» 1982, 9 (3).
 
30.
Wood C., Ritual well-being: toward a social signaling model of religion and mental health, «Religion, Brain and Behavior» 2016, 7 (3).
 
31.
Abū ‘Amr Al- Kinānī, It’s Either the Islamic State of the Flood, «Dabiq», No. 2.
 
32.
Break the Cross, «Dabiq», No. 15.
 
33.
By the Sword, «Dabiq», No. 15.
 
34.
Contemplate the Creation, «Dabiq», No. 15.
 
35.
Da’wah and Hisbah in the Islamic State, «Dabiq», No. 3.
 
36.
Foreword, «Dabiq», No. 15.
 
37.
Hijrah From Hypocrisy To Sincerity, «Dabiq», No. 3.
 
38.
Islam is the Religion of the Sword, Not Pacifism, «Dabiq», No. 7.
 
39.
Khilafah Declared, «Dabiq», No. 1.
 
40.
Kill the Imams of Kufr in the West, «Dabiq», No. 14.
 
41.
O you who have believed protect yourself and your families from fire, «Dabiq», No. 12.
 
42.
Reflections on the final crusade, «Dabiq», No. 4.
 
43.
The Evil of Division and Taqlid, «Dabiq», No. 11.
 
44.
The Extinction of the Grayzone, «Dabiq», No. 7.
 
45.
The Fitrah of Mankind and the Near-Extinction of the Western Woman, «Dabiq», No. 15.
 
46.
The Murtadd Brotherhood, «Dabiq», No. 14.
 
47.
The Rafidah from Ibn Saba’ to the Dajjal, «Dabiq», No. 13.
 
48.
Umm Khalid al-Finlandiyyah, How I Came to Islam, «Dabiq», No. 15.
 
49.
Why We Hate You & Why We Fight You, «Dabiq», No. 15.
 
50.
Words of Sincere Advice From an American Convert in the Islamic State To the Former Christian Who Accepted Islam, «Dabiq», No. 15.
 
ISSN:1640-8888