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POLITICAL PARTIES AND THEIR GOVERNMENTS IN THE FACE OF ECONOMIC GROWTH AND ECONOMIC REFORMS IN THE CENTRAL-EAST EUROPEAN COUNTRIES SINCE 1990
 
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EUROREG Centrum Europejskich Studiów Regionalnych i Lokalnych, Uniwersytet Warszawski
Дата публикации: 2019-12-24
 
Studia Politologiczne 2015;35
 
КЛЮЧЕВЫЕ СЛОВА:
СТАТЬЯ:
For realization plans of research five hypotheses were selected and verified. The results are described below. 1. Ideological differences of governments (left, right, centre) coexist with different indicators of economy. 2. Two pro-growth strategies; a) stimulation via budget and little pressure on reforms or b) high pressure on reforms, have statistical support, but more efficient is the second one. 3. The larger political power of the government (obtained votes) and the more stable is the government, the greater advancement of reforms and a relatively higher economic growth. 4. The higher the political power of centre and right parties, (participation in government weighted by number of days), the more advanced reforms and relatively higher economic growth. 5. Left parties are slightly less willing to quick implementation of reforms than right and centre parties.
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ISSN:1640-8888